SETH, GOD OF CONFUSION & THE WITCHING OTHER

Regular price $99.76

Tax included.

PRE-ORDER! 
The SETH books are expected to be with us by mid-February.

Get the SETH book at the regular price and get the THE WITCHING OTHER book  at a 25% discount off the standard retail price of 52 British pounds ($67.68) if purchased direct from Atramentous Press, dropping the price to $50.76.

Both books are detailed below:

SETH, GOD OF CONFUSION: A Study of His Role in Egyptian Mythology and Religion.

by Herman te Velde

Limited to 500 copies. A FINE CLOTH COPY, Smythe-sewn, bound in sand cloth, blind-embossed cover and spine, with special custom crimson textured end papers. Heavily illustrated with nineteen plates, and 15 additional illustrations en texte. New foreword by Egyptologist Anne Landborg, and includes an updated, extensive bibliography. A great feature of this new edition is a first time English translation of all the important French and German phrases and notes found in the original printing. The Egyptian god, Seth, was the lord of chaos, disorder, and warfare, and often was cast as the magical Trickster in the Egyptian pantheon as he embodied the creative element of violence and disorder within the ordered world. Please see the illustration that accompanies the listing at jdholmes.com where an assemblage of fifteen of the traditional god forms are displayed. This influential text has often been referenced by Egyptologists, Sethians, and magickal practitioners alike, including Aquino and Lavey. 200 pages. Royal octavo. 

Copies ordered directly from :AJNA: will receive a free letterpressed, debossed standard size bookmark featuring the stamped cloth motive from the book. 

&

THE WITCHING OTHER

: Explorations and Meditations on the Existential Witch

 

by Peter Hamilton-Giles,

Signed and numbered, hardcover with dust-jacket. 

Peter Hamilton-Giles, instigator and co-founder of the Dragon's Column being the body of initiates that went on to contribute material that would eventually be featured albeit in edited form in Andrew Chumbleys' Dragon Book of Essex.

To propose there is something ‘other’ to the witch might seem counter-intuitive, especially so since conjugating the witch into witching suggests particular agentive actions and decisions have already been made about the topic. One where the action of witching is then further hyphenated with the other must then result in increasing this level of obfuscation to new heights.