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DESTROYING ANGELS

Number 10 with a 3-D cover and glasses.

Articles with Pushead, Jos. A. Smith (Bathory stole their art from him in case you haven't been eating metal for breakfast), a great article about JIm Osbourne and several other articles, drawings and general entertainment.

Ray Zone, the king of 3-D comics (he helped bring this zine’s 3-D covers to life); Jos. A. Smith, creator of Bathory’s goat’s head; Julien Nagawika, who does his interview half-handwritten, half as comics; Pushead, who for the first time I’ve seen speaks not in pictures but with words, with a nuts-and-bolts guide for young artists (I can tell that Dread has dutifully followed it); and Jowita Kaminska,

Read More: Destroying Angels #10: The Battle for Art | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/destroying-angels-10-the-battle-for-art/?trackback=tsmclip

Ray Zone, the king of 3-D comics (he helped bring this zine’s 3-D covers to life); Jos. A. Smith, creator of Bathory’s goat’s head; Julien Nagawika, who does his interview half-handwritten, half as comics; Pushead, who for the first time I’ve seen speaks not in pictures but with words, with a nuts-and-bolts guide for young artists (I can tell that Dread has dutifully followed it); and Jowita Kaminska, whose work I will look up once I get my damn Internet back. Old habits die hard.

Two highlights stand out for me. The first is Nagawika’s comic strip of Dread collaborating with Darkthrone on an album cover. The strip captures its actors’ essences perfectly (as much as I know, anyway), and climaxes with an uproarious sendup of Dread’s style. Nagawika illustrating Dread illustrating Darkthrone – such referential humor is a hallmark of underground comics.

. . .

Excerpt from Jim Osborne biography

. . .

The second is a biography of comic artist Jim Osborne. Dread is an artist, not a writer, but for 12 pages he draws me into the vortex of Osborne’s life. It’s weird, fascinating, and tragic. ’70s San Francisco is a dark place filled with drugs and lost souls like Osborne. Dread’s passion for his subject is obvious. He draws on previously unpublished material and splices in excerpts of Osborne’s art, which is shocking and adventurous, even by today’s standards. The story is one of those draining but fulfilling experiences that make one say, “Whew!”.



Read More: Destroying Angels #10: The Battle for Art | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/destroying-angels-10-the-battle-for-art/?trackback=tsmclip

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Ray Zone, the king of 3-D comics (he helped bring this zine’s 3-D covers to life); Jos. A. Smith, creator of Bathory’s goat’s head; Julien Nagawika, who does his interview half-handwritten, half as comics; Pushead, who for the first time I’ve seen speaks not in pictures but with words, with a nuts-and-bolts guide for young artists (I can tell that Dread has dutifully followed it); and Jowita Kaminska,

Read More: Destroying Angels #10: The Battle for Art | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/destroying-angels-10-the-battle-for-art/?trackback=tsmclip

Ray Zone, the king of 3-D comics (he helped bring this zine’s 3-D covers to life); Jos. A. Smith, creator of Bathory’s goat’s head; Julien Nagawika, who does his interview half-handwritten, half as comics; Pushead, who for the first time I’ve seen speaks not in pictures but with words, with a nuts-and-bolts guide for young artists (I can tell that Dread has dutifully followed it); and Jowita Kaminska, whose work I will look up once I get my damn Internet back. Old habits die hard.

Two highlights stand out for me. The first is Nagawika’s comic strip of Dread collaborating with Darkthrone on an album cover. The strip captures its actors’ essences perfectly (as much as I know, anyway), and climaxes with an uproarious sendup of Dread’s style. Nagawika illustrating Dread illustrating Darkthrone – such referential humor is a hallmark of underground comics.

. . .

Excerpt from Jim Osborne biography

. . .

The second is a biography of comic artist Jim Osborne. Dread is an artist, not a writer, but for 12 pages he draws me into the vortex of Osborne’s life. It’s weird, fascinating, and tragic. ’70s San Francisco is a dark place filled with drugs and lost souls like Osborne. Dread’s passion for his subject is obvious. He draws on previously unpublished material and splices in excerpts of Osborne’s art, which is shocking and adventurous, even by today’s standards. The story is one of those draining but fulfilling experiences that make one say, “Whew!”.



Read More: Destroying Angels #10: The Battle for Art | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/destroying-angels-10-the-battle-for-art/?trackback=tsmclip

Ray Zone, the king of 3-D comics (he helped bring this zine’s 3-D covers to life); Jos. A. Smith, creator of Bathory’s goat’s head; Julien Nagawika, who does his interview half-handwritten, half as comics; Pushead, who for the first time I’ve seen speaks not in pictures but with words, with a nuts-and-bolts guide for young artists (I can tell that Dread has dutifully followed it); and Jowita Kaminska, whose work I will look up once I get my damn Internet back. Old habits die hard.

Two highlights stand out for me. The first is Nagawika’s comic strip of Dread collaborating with Darkthrone on an album cover. The strip captures its actors’ essences perfectly (as much as I know, anyway), and climaxes with an uproarious sendup of Dread’s style. Nagawika illustrating Dread illustrating Darkthrone – such referential humor is a hallmark of underground comics.

. . .

Excerpt from Jim Osborne biography

. . .

The second is a biography of comic artist Jim Osborne. Dread is an artist, not a writer, but for 12 pages he draws me into the vortex of Osborne’s life. It’s weird, fascinating, and tragic. ’70s San Francisco is a dark place filled with drugs and lost souls like Osborne. Dread’s passion for his subject is obvious. He draws on previously unpublished material and splices in excerpts of Osborne’s art, which is shocking and adventurous, even by today’s standards. The story is one of those draining but fulfilling experiences that make one say, “Whew!”.



Read More: Destroying Angels #10: The Battle for Art | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/destroying-angels-10-the-battle-for-art/?trackback=tsmclip